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How to Play Bumper Pool: The Ultimate Guide

How to Play Bumper Pool: The Ultimate Guide 0

Bumper pool consists of either a rectangle or octagon shaped table that has cloth and rails much like a regular pool table. Bumper pool tables are much smaller than traditional pool tables. The table has bumpers that are round and can be used to bounce the pool balls.
Seven Foot Pool Tables are Growing

Seven Foot Pool Tables are Growing 0

The new generation of home owners are buying more and more 7ft size billiard tables for their home game rooms. The approximate percentage of 7ft table compared to 8ft and 9ft tables historically was only about 10 to 15% of the market. 75 to 80% of home tables were 8ft size and 5% or less are 9ft size as these tables take up so much space in a large room. Since more home owners are “staying home” more people are buying pool tables to entertain and play at HOME. The 7ft size pool tables are selling at a growing rate of 20 to 25% of all tables sold which is up from previous years. Below are the suggested reasons for this growing increase:

  1. Smaller room sizes in newer homes dictate the need for smaller pool tables
  2. Game rooms in homes are being used for multiple activities and not just for playing pool
  3. 7ft Pool Tables cost less. (this is generally not the case as the material difference in production is very small)
  4. 7ft Pool Tables are easier to play than larger tables.

This is only partly true as 7ft pool tables are geometrically the same as 8ft and 9ft tables (the width of the playfield is exactly half of the length.) The means the 7ft table angles and shots are the same. The difference is only in firmness of stroke and degree of error. (A longer shot will reveal a larger miss when or if the shot is off target) Otherwise, a 7ft table be just as challenging and offer the same enjoyment as larger tables.

Most coin-operated pool tables in bars and pubs are 7ft size. These tables are a little different as the pocket opening (called the “mouth” of the pocket) are much wider than most home tables. This allows for balls to be pocketed faster thus the games are shorter enticing customers to pay to play more often. Home tables are a little more challenging and offer play consistent with a professional style table the pros would play on.

Pool Table Buying Guide: An Introduction

Pool Table Buying Guide: An Introduction 1

Prior to investing in a pool table - entry level or high end - make sure to familiarize yourself with some of the basic aspects of what makes a table valuable for your unique requirements.

Cleaning Billiard Table Cloth 0

A well enjoyed Pool Table is going to get dirty. It's a fact you can't deny. You've got the normal "dust" and fuzz ball issue, pet hair if you have a pet in the home, chalk trails, accidental spills and sometimes things you can't quite identify.

The main thing to remember when taking care of the cloth on your table is never, ever, ever use a vacuum on it. This is going to pull and stretch the cloth which dramatically decreases its' durability, not to mention affect the play of the table. Not much is more frustrating than having a shot lined up perfectly, only to have a wrinkle in the loose felt send your shot off in a completely different direction.

When you clean your felt, it's a good time to clean the balls too. For the balls, warm water with a little bit of detergent works well and rinses clean. Wet a towel, wring it out, clean each ball and set aside to air dry while you tend to the cloth.

For cleaning the cloth, begin by using a special brush to sweep the bumper railings debris on to the table and then sweep any debris or lint from the edges and around the pockets, towards the center of the table. Use straight motion with your sweep, don't go circular. You want to keep your motion going with the weave of the felt so it doesn't "pucker" or shift.
Once you've swept the bumper railings and edges and are ready to begin the full table sweep, begin in the middle and work towards each end. Remember to keep straight motions, no side to side or circular.

At each end of the table, lightly sweep the debris on to a piece of thin cardboard or dust pan. Make sure your dust pan doesn't have hard plastic edges or metal along the bottom that can accidentally snag or tear the felt. The ones with a soft, pliable rubber edge work great.

Some people use a vacuum attachment to clean the inside of the pockets. We recommend using a clean, damp towel to wipe them out. Don't even bring the vacuum out and you won't be tempted to use it on the felt.

If there is a spill on the table, it's best to clean it immediately with a dry, white, cotton absorbent cloth. If the spill is not recent, use a slightly wet, warm, absorbent cotton cloth. Water only. Soaps will leave a mark and some residue. Place the cloth over the area and let it do the work. Don't over-saturate the felt and don't rub- this will stretch the felt and weaken that area. Pat over the area until the spot is removed.

There are some commercial cleaners labeled for table top cleaning. They have been formulated to offer a "dry clean". Talk with a specially trained representative at your local Pool Table retailer to see if they have a product you would like to try.

  • Christian Gould
  • Tags: Guides