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Seven Foot Pool Tables are Growing

Seven Foot Pool Tables are Growing 0

The new generation of home owners are buying more and more 7ft size billiard tables for their home game rooms. The approximate percentage of 7ft table compared to 8ft and 9ft tables historically was only about 10 to 15% of the market. 75 to 80% of home tables were 8ft size and 5% or less are 9ft size as these tables take up so much space in a large room. Since more home owners are “staying home” more people are buying pool tables to entertain and play at HOME. The 7ft size pool tables are selling at a growing rate of 20 to 25% of all tables sold which is up from previous years. Below are the suggested reasons for this growing increase:

  1. Smaller room sizes in newer homes dictate the need for smaller pool tables
  2. Game rooms in homes are being used for multiple activities and not just for playing pool
  3. 7ft Pool Tables cost less. (this is generally not the case as the material difference in production is very small)
  4. 7ft Pool Tables are easier to play than larger tables.

This is only partly true as 7ft pool tables are geometrically the same as 8ft and 9ft tables (the width of the playfield is exactly half of the length.) The means the 7ft table angles and shots are the same. The difference is only in firmness of stroke and degree of error. (A longer shot will reveal a larger miss when or if the shot is off target) Otherwise, a 7ft table be just as challenging and offer the same enjoyment as larger tables.

Most coin-operated pool tables in bars and pubs are 7ft size. These tables are a little different as the pocket opening (called the “mouth” of the pocket) are much wider than most home tables. This allows for balls to be pocketed faster thus the games are shorter enticing customers to pay to play more often. Home tables are a little more challenging and offer play consistent with a professional style table the pros would play on.

Understanding Abacus Scoring for Shuffleboards and Game Tables

Understanding Abacus Scoring for Shuffleboards and Game Tables 0

Whether you’re playing a friendly game of shuffleboard, or you’ve got bragging rights on the line, keeping score is the only sure-fire way to declare a winner. However, keeping score on a shuffleboard table can be a little tricky if you’ve never kept score using an abacus scoring system before. 

 

Overview of Shuffleboard Scoring

The basic rules of shuffleboard scoring are relatively easy to understand. The table is segmented into three scoring areas at gradually further distances. Each scoring area is labeled from closest to furthest, with a 1, 2, or 3 to determine the points awarded for reaching it. As pucks slide down the table, their placement in the scoring areas will determine how many points to award each team.

Additionally, teams can score a 4 if they manage to slide a puck to the end and have it hang over the edge without falling into the gutter. This is referred to as scoring a hanger. According to varying house rules, you can also score a 5 if a puck hangs over the left or right corners of the scoring end.

Once both teams have thrown all pucks, you’ll need to tally the score for that frame. This is where it can get tricky to keep track of points. To award points for a frame, you’ll need to have thrown the furthest puck on the table, meaning only one team can score per frame. However, even if you did throw the furthest puck that frame, only the ones that are further than your opponent’s pucks count towards your score.

 

How To Use The Scoreboard On Shuffleboard Tables

Once you’ve tallied your score for that frame, you’ll need to adjust the scoreboard on the table. Most shuffleboard tables come equipped with an abacus scoring system. This system places 11 beads on a rod that all represent points. They consist of 9 black or chrome beads and 2 other colored beads (typically red or blue to differentiate teams).

All the beads will need to be in the center of the rod to begin scoring on the abacus scoring system. As you progress through frames and add points to your score, you’ll slide over one black or chrome bead for each point you earn. You’ll continue sliding over black or chrome beads until you score 10 points. Once you’ve scored 10 points, you’ll slide over one of the contrasting color beads to the end, which represents 10 points each. Once you’ve moved a 10 point bead, reset your 1 point beads to the center, and repeat the process until you reach the final score of 21 points. The winner has to win by 2 points.

 

Shuffleboard Abacus Scorer Instructions [Video Tutorial]

Rail Cushion Profiles: Which is Best for Your Pool Table?

Rail Cushion Profiles: Which is Best for Your Pool Table? 0

Rail cushions are crucial to your pool table's quality of play. If you're planning on replacing your cushions, first determine which cushion profile your table has now.

Billiard Table Slate 0

billiard table slateOne of the key components of a billiard table that you may not know much about is the billiard slate. Slate is the hard-rock material that makes up the playing surface of a billiard or pool table. Slate has two main purposes. One is to maintain a flat and level surface and the other is to provide weight. Some other billiard brands offer non-slate tables, but those generally do not meet the expectations that many consumers have. We offer high-quality, 1-inch slate on every Legacy billiard table. Slate comes in varying thicknesses from ½-inch all the way up to 2-inch. One inch is considered the standard in the industry, and that’s the size you see professionals using in competitive play. When shopping for a billiard table or pool table, keep in mind that slate is an incredibly important factor in maximizing playability. For more information about Billiard Slate, check out our video buyer's guide.